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La mia analisi: Il materiale











La lezione del GM Schwartzman I hope you have really enjoyed this one, and after you find out all about it, you will hopefully like it even more.  The game took place almost a century ago, but things like this still happen nowadays...
The position is obviously a really exciting one.  While materially equal, there is a lot of dynamic tension in the air.  Black looks like he has a little bit of an edge thanks to the pair of bishops, and the nice pawns on the queen side.  On the other hand, the white knight on f5 isn't exactly a bad knight either.  And the pawn on e4 is doing a terrific job of keeping the b7 bishop stuffed.  Unfortunately, it also stuffs white's own bishop, but that is besides the point...
I don't even know why I wasted a paragraph talking about the positional elements, since this puzzle is more about concrete possibilities.  You see, black did here something that many of us might be tempted to do: he resigned!  Ok, before you jump up and say that you would never have resigned in this position, please remember that you were looking for a move since I obviously would not have given you a resign-able position to solve.   And once you know that black must have something here, chances are you will find it.
During the game, things look and feel a little different.  If you were surprised by white's last move and suddenly found yourself with a bishop on d4 which is both pinned and under attack, not to mention un-defendable, you too might be tempted to give it all up.   After all, this is exactly what the current situation on the board shows: the rook on d7 is completely undefended, and there are not one but two white pieces on the 'd' file waiting to snatch it up once the bishop moves.  And the absence of black pawns on the 'e' and 'c' files kills any hopes of defending the bishop.
Of course, an experienced chess player will quickly realize the one glimmer of hope black has: white's queen is in front of the rook and not behind it, which means the only thing separating the white queen and black rook is the ... bishop on d4.  So, if there would only be a place the bishop could go to and threaten something while taking advantage of the discover queen threat...  Well, maybe there is such a square!
And here is the tricky part: persevering in this direction.  Unfortunately, that's not as easy as it sounds.  The bishop can go to a few places, indeed, but none of them look very attractive - they don't look like they threaten any major white pieces.   But here is the key: threatening checkmate is better than anything else!   Which is why 1...Bg1!! is the really nice move black should have made.

The idea?  Quite simple.  Attacking the queen and threatening the checkmate on h2 proves to be a lethal combination.  And you want to know the real funny thing?  The fact that the white queen and rook are doubled on the 'd' file is what causes his downfall.  Because even if the queen does get away and manages to defend the checkmate, it is the rook on d1 who is going to take the fall...
Needless to say, no matter what move white chooses he is still going to end up a queen down, and in this case, a rook and knight are not by far enough compensation.  Too bad for Mr. Marko, the gentleman who had the black pieces in this lovely position...